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The latest news on Business Insider Lists from Business Insider

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    BYU students on Brigham Young campus

    Safety is a primary and constant concern for many college students and parents. Campus-security presence, emergency procedures, local and campus crime rates, and drug and alcohol use are factors that determine the level of safety on a college campus.

    College-review site Niche used the above factors to compile their 2016 ranking of the safest college campuses in America. Schools with high health and safety scores and low crime, among other factors, were ranked safest by Niche. Read about their full methodology here.

    Unsurprisingly, many of the safest campuses are faith-based colleges and universities that prohibit the use of drugs and alcohol, while schools notorious for their party scene didn't fair as well.

    Brigham Young University, affiliated with the Mormon faith, came in as the safest campus in the nation, followed by Summit University, formerly known as Baptist Bible College & Seminary, and Regent University. Scroll through to check out the rest of the top 25.

    SEE ALSO: The 25 best school districts in America

    DON'T MISS: The 50 most underrated colleges in America

    25. Milligan College — Milligan College, TN

    Health and safety: A

    Drug safety: A

    Party scene: C

    Students at Milligan College report feeling safe on campus: "Almost all of campus is very well lit and the surrounding community doesn't tend to pose any type of security problems involving the campus."

    In addition, drugs and alcohol are prohibited on campus, according to one sophomore.



    24. The Baptist College of Florida — Graceville, FL

    Health and safety: A

    Drug safety: N/A

    Party scene: C-

    The Baptist College of Florida stresses to its students that drugs and alcohol are not allowed on campus.

    "Students are understanding of a clean lifestyle. Students are highly active in fitness sports and just hanging out with friends without the assistance of any other influence," said a sophomore.



    23. Penn State Abington — Abington, PA

    Health and safety: A

    Drug safety: A

    Party scene: C

    A Penn State Abington senior recently commented that the "school is in a safe town, and being on campus is the safest place I feel right now."

    Students also added that there is "rarely ever any talk of drugs on campus, and if there is it's usually about Drug Safety."



    See the rest of the story at Business Insider

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    Studying online

    For many people, restrictions on time and money make going to school full time impossible. But with the rise of online programs, it's easier and more affordable than ever to earn a degree — no matter where in the country you reside. 

    U.S. News & World Report recently released its 2016 list of the best online programs for earning a bachelor's degree, focusing on schools that effectively deliver affordable undergraduate degrees in a reasonable amount of time. To determine the rankings, U.S. News considered four categories: student engagement, faculty credentials and training, student services and technology, and peer reputation. (You can read a full breakdown of the methodology here.) Note that because of multiple ties, the ranking only goes through No. 17. 

    Read on to see the 19 schools that make earning a degree online as seamless as possible, according to U.S. News.

     

    SEE ALSO: The 50 colleges where students work the hardest

    DON'T MISS: The 50 best business schools in the world

    17. TIE: University of Nebraska Omaha

    U.S. News score: 90

    Cost per credit: $409 (out-of-state), $257 (in-state)

    Most popular major: Business/commerce

    The University of Nebraska Omaha offers more than 20 fully online degrees, including highly specialized programs like architectural engineering, gerontology, and aviation studies. A military-friendly school, UNO provides extra benefits to veterans, including participation in the Yellow Ribbon Post 9/11 GI Bill. 



    17. TIE: Regent University

    U.S. News score: 90

    Cost per credit: $395

    Most popular major: Business administration and management

    Online students at Regent University take classes from the same top-notch professors who teach on campus. Like with traditional classes, students still participate in class discussions via online threads and develop a community among their classmates, all while maintaining an independent schedule. 



    17. TIE: Charleston Southern University

    U.S. News score: 90

    Cost per credit: $490

    Most popular major: Business administration, management and operations

    Charleston Southern University offers three bachelor's degree programs for students who have no college experience up to those holding associate's degrees.

    Students in the organizational management program can take advantage of classes with rolling enrollment, which allows them to complete two accelerated seven-week courses per semester. 



    See the rest of the story at Business Insider

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    Academy for Information Technology NJ

    The difference between a good and a bad teacher can make or break a class — especially for high-school students in the midst of preparing for college.

    As part of their annual public-school rankingsNiche, a company that researches and compiles information on schools, found the places across the country that boast the highest-caliber public-school teachers.

    To compile their rankings, Niche examined over 100,000 schools based on 27 million reviews from more than 300,000 students and parents. Many are charter or magnet schools, meaning they pull in qualified students from around their districts. You can read more about the methodology here.

    Each of these schools received an "A+" ranking for their teachers — their numerical Niche scores are also listed below. Many of the schools boast a deep roster of these teachers, too, with student-to-teacher ratios below the national average of 16:1.

    Read on to see the top-25 public high schools with the best teachers.

    SEE ALSO: The best public high school in every state

    DON'T MISS: The 25 best public high schools in New York

    25. Academy for Allied Health Science

    Scotch Plains, New Jersey

    Teacher rating: 93.81

    Student-to-teacher ratio: 16:1

    Academics: A+

    One junior said:

    The teachers of this school I would say are some of the best. They never fail to push us to understand the topics at hand and make sure to engage each and every student as much as they can. They make sure we are at the top of our game and as much as we rely on them they [rely on us] as well, asking us questions on how to improve the course and make it better to understand. Overall, they push us to know more than just what is said in a textbook and never fail to give real life examples for better understanding.



    24. Granada Hills Charter High School

    Granada Hills, California

    Teacher rating: 93.82

    Student-to-teacher ratio: 27:1

    Academics: A+

    "Teachers at Granada genuinely care about each of their students and offer assistance concerning any trouble," a student commented. "When confused or need help, they will lend a helping hand and offer tutoring. They are some of the smartest people I know."

    Many students also feel prepared for college after their time at Granada Hills.

    "I think the teachers were hard working and provided a solid groundwork for students to learn from for the realities of the future," one graduate said.



    23. Glenbrook North High School

    Northbrook, Illinois

    Teacher rating: 93.99

    Student-to-teacher ratio: 13:1

    Academics: A+ 

    "The teachers in our school are passionate about what they teach and although not all the topics learned will pertain to our lives outside of high school, they do their best to apply what we learn to real world situations," one senior said.



    See the rest of the story at Business Insider

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    North Carolina State Engineering

    When you consider how expensive and time-intensive graduate degrees can be, online programs are a great way to continue working while you study at times that are more convenient to your schedule.

    Especially for engineers, whose jobs sometimes require long hours and trips to manufacturing plants or construction sites, "distance learning" can keep you competitive in your field.

    U.S. News & World Report recently published its 2016 list of the best online graduate engineering programs by looking at student engagement, faculty credentials and training, student services and technology, peer reputation, and admissions selectivity.

    Scroll down to see the top-20 online engineering programs for grad students.

    SEE ALSO: The 50 best computer-science and engineering schools in America

    AND: 50 colleges where students work the hardest

    20. University of South Florida

    Score: 66

    Cost per credit: $913 (out-of-state), $467 (in-state)

    The University of South Florida teaches graduate students the ins and outs of the engineering industry, including analytics, process optimization, and entrepreneurship. Students can find courses recorded and archived on the school's website at their leisure.



    19. University of North Carolina at Charlotte (Lee)

    Score: 67

    Cost per credit: $824 (out-of-state), $203 (in-state)

    UNC Charlotte offers a fast-track option for students to complete online graduate degrees in engineering in one year, with concentrations in energy systems, lean Six Sigma, systems analytics, and logistics and supply-chain management. The school also offers a PhD in infrastructure and environmental systems.



    16. TIE: University of Maryland (Clark)

    Score: 69

    Cost per credit: $1,066

    Grad students studying engineering at UMD's Clark School of Engineering have over 100 online classes to choose from, including niche courses like cybersecurity, project management, fire protection engineering, and bioengineering.



    See the rest of the story at Business Insider

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    business insider group shot

    Do you love reading and writing lists and rankings of interesting people, places, ideas, and businesses? Is so, this may be the job for you.

    Business Insider is looking for a paid intern to work on our Lists team.

    Lists interns spend their time researching and writing our big signature lists and features, like the Best Colleges In America, the Best Companies To Work For, and the Most Powerful People In The World. You'll get an author byline for every post you write. 

    We're looking for someone who is smart, organized, and a meticulous researcher. You should be comfortable conducting in-depth research on everything from the coolest small businesses in cities around the world to the most impressive students at top universities. 

    This person should be comfortable working on a variety of subjects and juggling multiple projects at a time. You'll get the opportunity to work with all of Business Insider's sections, so we welcome candidates with diverse interests.

    As for qualifications, a journalism background and experience writing for a news site always helps, as do copy-editing skills and light HTML and Photoshop experience. Knowledge of social media and previous writing experience are both useful, too.

    APPLY HEREwith a resume and cover letter if interested, and specify why you're interested in working on Lists.

    Please note that this internship requires that you work in our Manhattan office. The internship term runs for approximately six months, with some flexibility on start and end dates. Interns are encouraged to work full-time (40 hours a week) if their schedule allows.

    SEE ALSO: NOW HIRING: Business Insider is looking for a paid intern for its Strategy vertical

    Join the conversation about this story »


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    Deloitte

    Top consulting firms attract top talent, and top talent gets paid very competitively.

    Consulting-industry resource Management Consulted looked at 2016 compensation data from 17 prestigious consulting companies to find out which ones pay top candidates the most right out of college. 

    To determine these figures, they culled through data from clients, spoke with industry insiders, and pored over real offer letters from readers. 

    Management Consulted found that new hires in management-consulting positions can earn as much as $80,000 to $100,000 in total compensation their first year out of undergrad. They cautioned though that these figures represent maximum salary packages, not average compensation — typically only the top employees receive the full amount, with average and below-average employees earning significantly less.  

    Here are 17 of the top-paying consulting firms for new grads, ranked below by total compensation:

    1. Parthenon-EY

    Total compensation: Up to $110,000

    Base salary: $90,000
    Signing bonus: $10,000
    Performance bonus: Up to $10,000

    2. Boston Consulting Group (BCG)

    Total compensation: Up to $108,000

    Base salary: $75,000
    Signing bonus: $5,000
    Relocation: $2,000-$8,000
    Performance bonus: Up to $16,500

    3. McKinsey & Company

    Total compensation: Up to $107,000

    Base salary: $75,000
    Signing bonus: $5,000
    Relocation: $2,000-$9,000

    Performance bonus: Up to $18,000

    4. Bain & Company

    Total compensation: Up to $105,000

    Base salary: $80,000
    Signing bonus: $5,000
    Relocation: $2,000-$8,000
    Performance bonus: Up to $12,000

    5. Deloitte

    Total compensation: Up to $101,250

    Base salary: $75,000
    Signing bonus: $10,000
    Relocation: $2,000-$5,000

    Performance bonus: Up to $11,250

    6. Strategy&

    Total compensation: Up to $100,600

    Base salary: $73,000
    Signing bonus: $5,000
    Relocation: $5,000-$8,000
    Performance bonus: Up to $14,600

    7. Oliver Wyman

    Total compensation: Up to $100,000

    Base salary: $75,000
    Signing bonus: $10,000
    Performance bonus: Up to $15,000 (20% base for first year; up to 40% of base for second years)

    8. L.E.K.

    Total compensation: Up to $97,600

    Base salary: $73,000
    Signing bonus: $7,500
    Relocation: $2,000-$9,000
    Performance bonus: Up to $14,600

    9. A.T. Kearney

    Total compensation: Up to $96,250

    Base salary: $65,000
    Signing bonus: $5,000
    Relocation: $5,000-$10,000
    Performance bonus: Up to $9,750

    10. PwC

    Total compensation: Up to $95,950

    Base salary: $73,000
    Signing bonus: $5,000-$10,000
    Relocation: $2,000
    Performance bonus: Up to $10,950

    11. Accenture Consulting

    Total compensation: Up to $94,500

    Base salary: $75,000
    Signing bonus: $10,000
    Relocation: $2,000
    Performance bonus: Up to $7,500

    12. IBM Global Business Services

    Total compensation: Up to $94,000

    Base salary: $75,000
    Signing bonus: $7,000
    Relocation: $3,000
    Performance bonus: Up to $9,000

    13. EY

    Total compensation: Up to $80,000

    Base salary: $72,000
    Signing bonus: $5,000
    Relocation: $1,000
    Performance bonus: Up to $2,000

    14. FTI Consulting

    Total compensation: Up to $78,000

    Base salary: $62,000
    Signing bonus: $5,000
    Relocation: $1,000
    Performance bonus: Up to $10,000

    15. ZS Associates

    Total compensation: Up to $77,700

    Base salary: $62,000
    Signing bonus: $5,500
    Relocation: $4,000
    Performance bonus: Up to $6,200

    16. KPMG

    Total compensation: Up to $75,000

    Base salary: $65,000
    Signing bonus: Rare
    Relocation: $2,000
    Performance bonus: Up to $8,000

    17. Mercer

    Total compensation: $67,000 + overtime

    Base salary: $62,000
    Signing bonus: $3,000
    Relocation: $2,000
    Performance bonus: No bonus; instead, paid time and a half for every hour over 40 a week

    SEE ALSO: The 50 colleges where students earn the highest salaries

    AND: 7 negotiating tricks to get the salary you deserve in 2016

    Join the conversation about this story »

    NOW WATCH: Business dining etiquette rules every professional should know


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    EY

    Even straight out of school, earning an MBA means a healthy salary bump for graduates, especially in lucrative industries like consulting.

    And with increasing demand for management consultants, elite firms are doling out hefty compensation packages to stay competitive and attract top talent. In fact, at many places, the base pay for MBAs starts at $140,000 — more than $60,000 higher than the starting salaries that many candidates earn right out of college.

    Management Consulted, a company that helps candidates land consulting jobs, compiled the top salaries earned by graduates in their first year out of business school at 17 leading consulting firms. To determine these figures, it culled through data from clients, spoke with industry insiders, and pored over real offer letters from readers.

    It's important to note that these represent maximum salary packages, not average compensation. Typically, only the top employees receive the full amount, with most employees earning significantly less.

    Read one to see the consulting firms in which MBAs are raking in the big bucks, ranked by total compensation:

    SEE ALSO: 22 MBA programs where graduates earn more than $110,000 right out of school

    DON'T MISS: The 50 best business schools in the world

    17. Mercer

    Total compensation: up to $124,400

    Signing bonus: $20,000
    Base: $87,000
    Performance bonus: up to $17,400

     



    16. Kalypso

    Total compensation: up to $150,000

    Signing bonus: $15,000
    Base: $120,000
    Performance bonus: up to $15,000



    15. IMS Consulting Group

    Total compensation: up to $165,000

    Signing bonus: $25,000
    Base: $125,000
    Performance bonus: up to $15,000



    See the rest of the story at Business Insider

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    Futuristic woman

    Over the years we've seen the workplace go through a number of dramatic changes: The dress code has shifted away from the suit and tie. There are entire jobs devoted only to the strategic use of social media. People are "job hopping" every year or two, rather than committing their careers to one company.

    And that's just within the last five or 10 years; imagine how much different it will look several decades from now.

    Business Insider spoke to futurists with expertise on the workplace to better understand how it could change by the year 2050. These are only predictions, of course, but given the already rapid pace of change underway thanks to advancements in technology, here are nine very likely scenarios we could see in the next few decades.

    SEE ALSO: 25 ways the world changed in 2015

    NOW READ: 25 jobs that might not be around in the future

    The corporate ladder could become the "corporate lattice."

    In the past 25 years, one-quarter of companies have reduced the number of layers of management they have, moving toward a flatter, more grid-like management structure.

    We've already seen it in companies like Vegas-based e-commerce site Zappos, which eliminated employee titles just over two years ago in favor of a manager-free "holacracy."

    "Traditional roles are going to disappear because many workplaces are going to disappear, so the whole structural hierarchical system is going to disappear," said James Canton, PhD, chairman and CEO of the Institute for Global Futures and author of "Future Smart: Managing the Game-Changing Trends that Will Transform Your World.""You'll end up with a system, a network of humans and artificial intelligence, crowd-based intelligence — they're all going to get mashed up."



    Artificial intelligence could replace jobs previously held by humans ...

    In May, NPR created a digital tool to calculate how likely it is that certain jobs will be taken over by robots 20 years from now.

    Manual-labor jobs appear to be most at risk, while jobs that require empathy, like social workers and caretakers, are least at risk.

    A University of Oxford report predicts that "by 2030, let alone by 2050, we'll have lost almost 50% of the workforce to artificial intelligence," said David Price, co-founder of cultural-change practice We Do Things Differently and author of "OPEN: How We'll Work, Live and Learn in the Future."

    The Oxford report, which examined sectors most likely to lose jobs, noted that the transportation and logistics industry was particularly susceptible to upheaval thanks to the development of driverless cars by companies like Google.

    Even jobs that seemingly require the human touch, like the classroom teacher, are at risk. 

    "We're already seeing experiments with this robot in the classroom, and when you ask kids with autism which one they'd rather be taught by, the teacher or the robot, they pick the robot," Price said.



    ... but could also create jobs that didn't exist before.

    New technology doesn't always mean the loss of jobs. The invention of the printing press actually created a lot of jobs back in the day, said Price, "and we're going to gain jobs as well, but it's guesswork which jobs we'll gain."

    Canton predicts a scenario in which humans and robots work side-by-side in the future, where new jobs could include operating artificial intelligence-based technology and old jobs could be augmented by it.

    "We're going to need to train people — whether on the factory floor or in a call center — how to use A.I. smarter," Canton said. "So right now the era of using these knowledge bases is kind of cumbersome, but over the next decades artificial intelligence will sense what somebody is asking a customer and will help the human operator provide better service."



    See the rest of the story at Business Insider

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    Bain & Company lobby from facebook page

    Landing a management consultant position at a top firm right out of college can result in a salary package topping $100,000 for the best employees — and more than $200,000 for recent MBAs. 

    But the first step toward securing such a coveted job is acing the internship. And at many prestigious consulting firms, interns are well compensated from the get-go — especially if they're working on their MBAs.

    Management Consulted, a company that helps candidates land consulting jobs, compiled data on some of the top-paying firms for interns. To determine these figures, it culled through information from clients, spoke with industry insiders, and pored over real offer letters from readers.

    With typical internships lasting 10 weeks or more, Management Consulted found that undergraduates can expect to make in excess of $1,000 per week. Meanwhile interns working on their MBAs often command more than twice that amount.

    Compensation for consulting interns

    A.T. Kearney

    Undergraduate: $11,000
    MBA: $11,500/month


    Bain & Company

    Undergraduate: $12,500
    MBA: $27,000 


    Boston Consulting Group

    Undergraduate: $13,500
    MBA: $28,000


    Deloitte 

    Undergraduate: $31/hour; $47.50/hour for overtime
    MBA: $28,450 + 2nd year MBA tuition reimbursement (up to $50,000)


    IMS Consulting Group

    Undergraduate: $11,000 + bonus
    MBA: $11,250/month + $5,000 signing bonus


    L.E.K.

    Undergraduate: $11,000/month
    MBA: $2,600/week + up to $4,000 performance bonus


    McKinsey & Company

    Undergraduate: $12,500/month
    MBA: $29,500


    PwC

    Undergraduate: $33.50/hour, $50.25/hour for overtime 
    MBA: $11,250/month

    ZS Associates

    Undergraduate: $11,000
    MBA: $11,000/month + $5,000 signing bonus 

    SEE ALSO: 17 of the highest-paying consulting firms for new graduates

    NOW READ: 17 of the highest-paying consulting firms for MBAs

    Join the conversation about this story »

    NOW WATCH: What to do with your hands during a job interview


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    Yale selfie

    Obviously, college is more than just football games and dorm parties — it's also a lot of work. But some students are working harder than others.

    Nichea company that researches and compiles information on schools, analyzed its data to find the colleges where students work the hardest.

    To come up with this ranking, Niche looked at the academic rigor and student workload at traditional four-year schools in the US.

    It took the academic grade for each school based on the quality of the professors, academic achievements of incoming students, graduation rates, and student reviews of their academic experience. Niche also calculated a composite score of users' responses to questions pertaining to study habits, class attendance, homework, office hours and study sessions, and overall workload. Each factor was given equal weight and combined into Niche's final score out of 100.

    Visit Niche for more college rankings, and read on to see the top 50 schools where students hit the books the hardest.

    SEE ALSO: The 50 best business schools in the world

    DON'T MISS: The best public high school in every state

    50. University of Virginia

    Charlottesville, Virginia

    Niche score: 90

    From day one, UVA students put in tremendous effort.

    "You'll be working your [butt] off, but you should be learning, too," one freshman said.

    A sophomore agreed: "The professors for the most part are extremely approachable, libraries are a great and beautiful option for studying, and classes are extremely difficult but worthwhile if you put the necessary time into them."

    Visit Niche for more information on the University of Virginia.



    49. Emory University

    Atlanta, Georgia

    Niche score: 90.1

    "The workload is difficult, but there are exceptional professors who make it worthwhile," one sophomore reported.

    Students also point out that time-management skills are key to handling the workload.

    "Emory is definitely not an easy school in terms of academics, but what you get out of your education is very rewarding," one freshman said. "As long as you manage your time well, you should be able to manage your workload while keeping up with your social life."

    Visit Niche for more information on Emory University.



    48. Colgate University

    Hamilton, New York

    Niche score: 90.3

    "My classes are heavy in reading and writing and I have a rather large workload," one freshman noted.

    But there are upsides.

    "Teachers are great and always there to help you, and my biggest class is 30 people," they added.

    Visit Niche for more information on Colgate University.



    See the rest of the story at Business Insider

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    GettyImages 151367140

    Of the world's wealthiest people, the majority still hail from the world's top economic superpower — the United States. There are 29 US billionaires who rank among the 50 richest on earth, and they command a whopping $938 billion between them.

    This comes from new data provided to Business Insider by Wealth-X, a company that conducts research on the super-wealthy, featured in our recent ranking of the world's richest people. Wealth-X maintains a database of dossiers on more than 110,000 ultra-high-net-worth people, using a proprietary valuation model that takes into account each person's assets, then adjusts estimated net worth to account for currency-exchange rates, local taxes, savings rates, investment performance, and other factors.

    The two richest people in America are no surprise: Bill Gates and Warren Buffett maintain their lead at the top despite being the two most generous people on earth. But US tech moguls have begun to overtake the upper echelon, with heavyweights like Jeff Bezos of Amazon and Mark Zuckerberg of Facebook adding billions to their net worth each year as their powerful companies continue to grow in value and influence.

    Not everyone is an entrepreneur though. Inherited wealth has kept a hefty portion of the country's cash in the hands of a few families, as the Koch brothers, the Waltons of Walmart, and the heirs to the Mars candy conglomerate each rank among the wealthiest.

    Read on to learn more about the 29 Americans with the deepest pockets.  

    SEE ALSO: The 50 richest people on earth

    DON'T MISS: The wealthiest people in the world under 35

    28. James Simons

    Net worth:$14.3 billion

    Age: 77

    Country: US

    Industry: Hedge funds

    Source of wealth: Self-made; Renaissance Technologies

    Before revolutionizing the hedge fund industry with his mathematics-based approach, "Quant King" James Simons worked as a code breaker for the US Department of Defense during the Vietnam War, but was fired after criticizing the war in the press. He chaired the math department at Stony Brook University for a decade until leaving in 1978 to start a quantitative-trading firm. That firm, now called Renaissance Technologies, has more than $65 billion in assets under management among its many funds.

    Simons has always dreamed big. About 10 years ago, he announced that he was starting a fund that he claimed would be able to handle $100 billion, about 10% of all assets managed by hedge funds at the time. That fund, Renaissance Institutional Equities Fund, never quite reached his aspirations — it currently handles about $10.5 billion— but his flagship Medallion fund is among the best-performing ever: It has generated a nearly 80% annualized return before fees since its inception in 1988.

    In October, Renaissance shut down a $1 billion fund — one of its smaller ones — "due to a lack of investor interest." The firm's other funds, however, have been up and climbing. Simons retired in 2009, but remains chairman of the company.



    28. Laurene Powell Jobs

    Net worth:$14.4 billion

    Age: 52

    Country: US

    Industry: Media

    Source of wealth: Inheritance; Disney

    The widow of Apple cofounder Steve Jobs, Laurene Powell Jobs inherited his wealth and assets, which included 5.5 million shares of Apple stock and a 7.3% stake in The Walt Disney Co., upon his death. Jobs' stake in Disney — which has nearly tripled in value since her husband's death in 2011 and comprises more than $12 billion of her net worth — makes her the company's largest individual shareholder.

    Though she's best recognized through her iconic husband, Jobs has had a career of her own. She worked on Wall Street for Merrill Lynch and Goldman Sachs before earning her MBA at Stanford in 1991, after which she married her late husband and started organic-foods company Terravera. But she's been primarily preoccupied with philanthropic ventures, with a particular focus on education. In 1997, she founded College Track, an after-school program that helps low-income students prepare for and enroll in college, and in September she committed $50 million to a new project called XQ: The Super School Project, which aims to revamp the high-school curriculum and experience.

    Last October, Jobs spoke out against "Steve Jobs," Aaron Sorkin's movie about her late husband that portrays him in a harsh light, calling it "fiction." Jobs had been against the project from the get-go, reportedly calling Leonardo DiCaprio and Christian Bale to ask them to decline roles in the film.



    27. Charlie Ergen

    Net worth:$14.5 billion

    Age: 62

    Country: US

    Industry: Media

    Source of wealth: Self-made; Dish Network

    After four years away from satellite TV provider Dish Network, the company he founded in 1980, Charlie Ergen returned to his position as CEO last spring. But Ergen's reunion came amid difficult times for Dish, as the company has been striving to stem its slipping number of subscribers.

    But one of the network's newest services might be its saving grace. Last January, the company launched Sling TV, a streaming service that allows subscribers to watch their favorite channels, such as ESPN and Food Network, online for only $20 per month. Though Sling is a 180-degree pivot from Dish's signature product, it has caught on with customers, inspiring copycat services and potentially providing the struggling company with the leg up it needed.

    Despite not offering wireless plans to subscribers, Ergen also bought up nearly $10 billion worth of wireless-spectrum licenses at an auction last year. But the purchase incited significant backlash against Dish, which through two controlled affiliates had secured a 25% small-business discount that was subsequently revoked by the FCC. The company was forced to pay penalties exceeding $500 million to the FCC and surrender some of the licenses. Controversy surrounding Ergen's leadership is nothing new, however. His reputation for cutthroat business tactics in the past led The Hollywood Reporter to dub him the "the most hated man in Hollywood."



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    Bill and Melinda Gates with Ingrid Schulerud and Norwegian PM Jens Stoltenberg, Oslo Opera House

    Some things never change: Bill Gates is still the richest person in the world. He’s been among the wealthiest since Microsoft went public in 1986, and he only got richer as the company's software became the de facto standard on computers around the world.

    Gates' net worth today sits at $87.4 billion, according to new Wealth-X data on the world's 50 richest people. That makes Gates more than $20 billion richer than runner-up Amancio Ortega, the man behind Spanish fashion behemoth Zara. 

    Despite a pledge to donate half of his wealth — his personal lifetime giving already exceeds $27 billion and makes him the most generous person on earth — Gates is still earning money faster than he can give it away.

    "I'm certainly well taken care of in terms of food and clothes,"he said in a 2013 Telegraph article. "Money has no utility to me beyond a certain point. Its utility is entirely in building an organization and getting the resources out to the poorest in the world."

    Since stepping down as CEO of Microsoft in 2000, Gates has shifted his focus to global philanthropy. He and his wife Melinda run one of the most powerful charitable organizations in the world, controlling an endowment of more than $40 billion. The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation regularly donates millions to causes in agricultural development, emergency relief, urban poverty, global health, and education. The foundation made its largest single donation ever in 2014 — a $50 million gift to fight the spread Ebola in West Africa.

    Gates is one of 29 Americans and 12 tech moguls to make the cut for the 50 richest people in the world

    SEE ALSO: The 50 richest people on earth

    SEE ALSO: The 29 richest people in America

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    Poolesville High School

    Each state has a ton of public high schools, but some really stand out.

    Niche, a company that researches and compiles information on schools, just released its 2016 rankings of the best public high schools in the US. We took a look at which school earned the top slot in every state.

    The ranking examined over 100,000 schools based on 27 million reviews from more than 300,000 students and parents.

    They rated schools in areas like academics, teachers, student culture and diversity, and resources and facilities. (Read more about the methodology here.) Many are charter or magnet schools, meaning they pull in qualified students from around their districts.

    SEE ALSO: The 25 best public high schools in America

    DON'T MISS: The 50 smartest private high schools in America

    ALABAMA: Loveless Academic Magnet Program High School

    Location: Montgomery

    Academics: A+

    Student culture & diversity: A

    Teachers: A+

    Resources & facilities: B-

    "Providing students with a tough and rigorous academic environment, Loveless consistently develops [students] that colleges are actively seeking," one senior said. "The school makes you appreciate the value of a good education, and instills motivating values in the students."



    ALASKA: Unalaska Junior/Senior High School

    Location: Unalaska

    Academics: N/A

    Student culture & diversity: N/A

    Teachers: N/A

    Resources & facilities: N/A

    "Most of our teachers know the students personally," one junior reported of the small school, which earned an overall A+ grade from Niche. "All of our teachers encourage us to do our best and get help if needed. They are usually available before and after school for anyone who needs it."



    ARIZONA: University High School

    Location: Tucson

    Academics: A+

    Student culture & diversity: A

    Teachers: A+

    Resources & facilities: C-

    "This school is challenging but definitely worth it," one sophomore said. "If you put in the work, this school will prepare you very well for college."

    Another sophomore noted, "University High School is a unique school that gives students the freedom to express themselves through their academic experiences. Teachers are overall caring, and the variety of AP classes offered give a fantastic head-start for college."

     



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    head teeth jaws crocodile

    At Business Insider, we have interviewed hundreds of job applicants.

    We are usually impressed with the calibre of candidates. Most people we meet seem smart and accomplished, and applicants "get" our all-digital, fast-paced, anti-boring way of handling business news.

    But ... young people are human, too. They make mistakes. And the following mistakes have cost them the jobs their CVs and résumés otherwise said they were good for ...

    20. Typos in your cover letter, CV, or résumé.

    Your command of written English — spelling, grammar, and punctuation — is a shorthand test of your intelligence. Or at least, of your ability to memorize the rules of the language. Typos make you look unintelligent, even though smart people make mistakes all the time.

    Tip: Get someone else to edit your letter and CV before you send them.



    19. Having bad breath.

    Everyone suffers from dry mouth at the office.

    Tip: Chew a piece of gum and then remove it five minutes before the interview.



    18. Not telling a good story about your life.

    Who are you, what are you good at, and what do you want to do with your life? We want a quick, clear history of your life and career so far. At Business Insider, storytelling is literally what we do, but at any company, communication is key. If you cannot communicate who you are quickly, you're not getting the job.

    Tip: Write it down beforehand and rehearse with a friend.



    See the rest of the story at Business Insider

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    jorge paulo lemannOf the 50 wealthiest people in the world, only one hails from South America: Brazilian business magnate Jorge Paulo Lemann, who's worth $25 billion.

    Brazil's wealthiest man ranks as the 26th richest person in the world, according to data provided to Business Insider by Wealth-X, a company that conducts research on the super-wealthy, as featured in our recent list of the 50 richest people on earth.

    Lemann took an unorthodox path to affluence. He worked as a journalist and professional tennis player — he played at Wimbledon — before buying a small brokerage in Brazil for $800,000 in 1971. Lemann and his partners modeled the firm after Goldman Sachs, eventually building it into a powerhouse and selling to Credit Suisse in 1998 for $657 million.

    In 2004, he cofounded investment firm 3G Capital, where he’s built a reputation for orchestrating huge mergers and acquisitions, often alongside friend and fellow billionaire Warren Buffett. At the end of 2014, Lemann created a fast-food giant, with the help of Buffett's Berkshire Hathaway, by merging Burger King with Canadian brand Tim Hortons in a series of deals worth over $11 billion.

    Then last March, 3G and Berkshire Hathaway teamed up again to invest $10 billion into the megamerger of Kraft and Heinz, which created the fifth-largest food and beverage company in the world with combined revenues of $28 billion.

    And in November, 3G's Anheuser-Busch InBev orchestrated a mammoth $108 billion deal to take over SABMiller, becoming the most dominant beer producer in the world. The megamerger puts brand-name beers like Budweiser, Stella Artois, and Leffe all under one roof, and it puts Lemann one step closer to his lifelong dream of controlling the beer market.

    Lemann, who also has a home in Zurich, Switzerland, remains notoriously private when it come to his personal life, choosing to let his business performance do the talking.

    SEE ALSO: The 50 richest people on earth

    Join the conversation about this story »

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    2x1_coolest businesses in ATL

    Atlanta is one of the hottest up-and-coming cities in the south. It's increasingly becoming a destination for good food, drinks, shopping, and conducting business in general.

    We found 19 cool, small businesses in the Atlanta-metro area that opened within the last five years or so — everything from a company that makes adult sodas to a bed and breakfast that doubles as an urban farm.

    Keep scrolling to check out the coolest new businesses in the ATL.

    SEE ALSO: The 16 coolest new businesses in Portland

    AND: The 50 coolest new businesses in America

    American Row House

    91 Church St., Marietta

    What it is: The SoulCycle of rowing.

    Why it's cool: Rowing will work 84% of the muscles in the body when done correctly, and American Row House aims to take the effectiveness of a rowing workout to a studio setting. Founded by a husband-and-wife team — an exercise physiologist and a chiropractor — ARH is based on the SoulCycle model of exercising, with a supportive environment and luxurious amenities like organic coffee and eucalyptus towels.



    Brash Coffee

    1168 Howell Mill Rd.

    What it is: A hip, new coffee shop built inside a couple of shipping containers.

    Why it's cool: Brash Coffee started in Chattanooga, Tennessee, and recently opened its second location in Atlanta's Westside Provisions District. But instead of a traditional brick-and-mortar store, Brash repurposed two shipping containers on a grassy patch in front of Yeah!Burger. With floor-to-ceiling windows and a sleek, modern interior, Brash serves ethically sourced coffee that the baristas roast in-house.



    Church Murch

    489 Edgewood Ave.

    What it is: A kitchy store spunoff from a church bar and ping-pong emporium.

    Why it's cool: From the founder of the successful Sister Louisa's Church of the Living Room and Ping Pong Emporium — an eccentric, church-themed tavern and table tennis venue — Church Murch is the just-launched retail store by the same owner. Church Murch sells all kinds of bric-a-brac and tchotchkes from vintage choir robes to greeting cards, Bible belts, bumper stickers, and artwork by Sister Louisa's owner Grant Henry.



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    warren buffett

    The world's top investors spend their days handling money and generating substantial returns for their clients — and the best of the best make billions for themselves in the process. 

    Business Insider recently released its list of the 50 richest people on earth in partnership with Wealth-X, a company that conducts research on the super-wealthy. Wealth-X maintains a database of dossiers on more than 110,000 ultra-high-net-worth people, using a proprietary valuation model to discern the size of their fortunes. 

    When narrowed down to those who work in finance, the list encompasses a some of the greatest investors and financiers in history, including legendary Berkshire Hathaway CEO Warren Buffett and Ray Dalio, the most successful hedge fund manager ever. Combined, these 10 men are worth nearly $260 billion and control far more of the world's wealth through their funds and investments.

    Read on to see the rest of wealthiest people in finance. 

     

    SEE ALSO: The 50 richest people on earth

    DON'T MISS: The 20 most generous people in the world

    10. James Simons

    Net worth:$14.3 billion

    Age: 77

    Country: US

    Industry: Hedge funds

    Source of wealth: Self-made; Renaissance Technologies

    Before revolutionizing the hedge fund industry with his mathematics-based approach, "Quant King" James Simons worked as a code breaker for the US Department of Defense during the Vietnam War, but was fired after criticizing the war in the press. He chaired the math department at Stony Brook University for a decade until leaving in 1978 to start a quantitative-trading firm. That firm, now called Renaissance Technologies, has more than $65 billion in assets under management among its many funds.

    Simons has always dreamed big. About 10 years ago, he announced that he was starting a fund that he claimed would be able to handle $100 billion, about 10% of all assets managed by hedge funds at the time. That fund, Renaissance Institutional Equities Fund, never quite reached his aspirations — it currently handles about $10.5 billion— but his flagship Medallion fund is among the best-performing ever: It has generated a nearly 80% annualized return before fees since its inception in 1988.

    In October, Renaissance shut down a $1 billion fund — one of its smaller ones — "due to a lack of investor interest." The firm's other funds, however, have been up and climbing. Simons retired in 2009, but remains chairman of the company.



    9. Ray Dalio

    Net worth:$16.3 billion

    Age: 66

    Country: US

    Industry: Hedge funds

    Source of wealth: Self-made; Bridgewater Associates

    Ray Dalio's hedge fund, Bridgewater Associates, is the biggest in the world, managing a portfolio of around $154 billion in global investments.

    At the top of his industry and having amassed an enormous fortune, Dalio has more recently focused on giving away money and advice. He's taken the Giving Pledge, committing to donate the majority of his wealth to charity. And last year he shared his highly coveted "investment secrets," albeit in an unorthodox manner for a hedge funder, in a 30-minute YouTube video, which has been watched more than 2 million times. His 123-page, self-published manual on his principles of money management and leadership is also seen as somewhat of a bible among the investment world.

    Dalio has always taken a radical approach to management, making everything he and his fund does completely transparent to employees. And it's worked well for him: Bridgewater, while sometimes viewed as "cultish," is one of the most coveted places to work in finance. Dalio has said that he attributes his success, in part, to reminding himself that history repeats itself and keeping track of the decisions he's made that didn't work.



    8. Len Blavatnik

    Net worth:$16.7 billion

    Age: 58

    Country: US

    Industry: Diversified investments

    Source of wealth: Self-made; Access Industries

    After earning degrees at Columbia University and Harvard Business School, Len Blavatnik— a Ukraine-born American — founded Access Industries, a privately held industrial company, in 1986. The company began with only Russian investments, but it now boasts a diverse portfolio that includes natural resources, chemicals, media and telecommunications, and real estate.

    Blavatnik built his fortune through business savvy and a knack for making well-timed investments. In 2004, his company purchased a 20% stake in Tory Burch, becoming the first and largest outside investor in the fashion house, which has since blossomed into a powerhouse retailer worth over $3 billion. He's credited with one of the greatest investments of all time in his risky buyout of petrochemicals maker LyondellBasell, which he purchased out of bankruptcy amid the financial crisis for north of $2 billion. The value of his stake had jumped to more than $10 billion in 2014. He incurred a comparatively measly fine of $656,000 from the Federal Trade Commission in October for failing to properly report his investments in the company.

    Recently he's tried his hand as a music mogul, purchasing Warner Music Group in 2011 for $3.3 billion. Two years later, he bought British label Parlophone for $742 million, giving him an expanded roster of musical acts that includes Coldplay, Blur, Metallica, and Bruno Mars. His music holdings also include investments in emerging-technology companies such as Spotify and Beats Electronics.



    See the rest of the story at Business Insider

    0 0

    head teeth jaws crocodile

    At Business Insider, we have interviewed hundreds of job applicants.

    We are usually impressed with the calibre of candidates. Most people we meet seem smart and accomplished, and applicants "get" our all-digital, fast-paced, anti-boring way of handling business news.

    But ... young people are human, too. They make mistakes. And the following mistakes have cost them the jobs their CVs and résumés otherwise said they were good for ...

    20. Typos in your cover letter, CV, or résumé.

    Your command of written English — spelling, grammar, and punctuation — is a shorthand test of your intelligence. Or at least, of your ability to memorize the rules of the language. Typos make you look unintelligent, even though smart people make mistakes all the time.

    Tip: Get someone else to edit your letter and CV before you send them.



    19. Having bad breath.

    Everyone suffers from dry mouth at the office.

    Tip: Chew a piece of gum and then remove it five minutes before the interview.



    18. Not telling a good story about your life.

    Who are you, what are you good at, and what do you want to do with your life? We want a quick, clear history of your life and career so far. At Business Insider, storytelling is literally what we do, but at any company, communication is key. If you cannot communicate who you are quickly, you're not getting the job.

    Tip: Write it down beforehand and rehearse with a friend.



    See the rest of the story at Business Insider

    0 0

    Ingvar Kamprad

    Swedish business magnate Ingvar Kamprad has been at the helm of IKEA, one of the world's largest furniture stores and most beloved brands, for more than 70 years.

    With a net worth of $39.3 billion, the retailer ranks as the 10th richest person on earth and the second-richest in Europe, according to new data from Wealth-X.

    The 89-year-old grew his flatpacking-furniture brand by maintaining a personal and professional ethos of innovation and simplicity. 

    From humble beginnings selling holiday tchotchkes to his neighbors as a child, Kamprad started a revolutionary, privately held furniture giant with $33 billion in sales  — and became one of the richest people on the planet in the process.

     

    SEE ALSO: The 8 richest people in Europe

    SEE ALSO: The 50 richest people on earth

    Kamprad was born in the south of Sweden in 1926 and by the age of 5 began selling matches for profit. At 10, he rode his bike around the neighborhood to sell Christmas decorations, fish, and pencils.

    Source: Business Insider, Sweden.se



    In his teens, Kamprad became involved in a Nazi youth movement by the influence of his German grandmother, who was "a great admirer of Hitler." He later described that time as "the greatest mistake of my life" and even penned a letter to his employees asking their forgiveness.

    Source: Telegraph, Fortune



    When Kamprad was 17, his dad gave him a cash reward for making good grades in school despite his dyslexia. He used the money to found IKEA in 1943. Kamprad didn't introduce furniture until five years in; he'd started by selling small household items, like picture frames.

    Source: Business Insider



    See the rest of the story at Business Insider

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    Alice Walton (Jim out of focus)

    With a net worth of $33.2 billion, Alice Walton isn't just the wealthiest woman on our list of the 50 richest people on earth, she's also a member of one of the richest families in the world. 

    Alice, along with older brothers Jim and Rob — who also graced the list, produced with Wealth-Xa company that conducts research on the superwealthy— have a combined net worth of $101.5 billion, thanks primarily to their stake in retail giant Walmart.

    Unlike her brothers, 66-year-old Walton never took an active role in running the retail empire her father started in 1962, though she's still managed to become the target of pushback from minimum-wage Walmart employees who view her highfalutin lifestyle as insensitive and ignorant to the plight of many workers.

    Instead of spending time at Walmart, Walton became a patron of the arts at a young age. When she was just 10 years old, Walton saved up her allowance to buy a reproduction of Picasso's "Blue Nude,"she told The New Yorker.

    "Collecting has been such a joy, and such an important part of my life in terms of seeing art, and loving it,” she said.

    She began buying watercolor pieces in the 1970s and adorning the walls of her Rocking W Ranch with them. From there she moved on to more serious original works, particularly those by classic American artists; her immense personal collection now includes pieces from Andy Warhol, Norman Rockwell, and Georgia O'Keefe, among others.

    In 2011, she opened the $50 million Crystal Bridges Museum in Arkansas to house her $500 million collection. When it opened, Crystal Bridges already had four times the endowment of the famous Whitney Museum in New York.

    Before delving into the art realm, Walton made a brief career as an equity analyst and even founded her own investment bank, Llama Company, in 1988. The company closed about 10 years later, shortly after Walton was arrested for driving under the influence of alcohol (not for the first time).

    Twice divorced with no children, Walton is also a lover of horses, which she breeds at Rocking W Ranch, located in Texas, and rides competitively. The 1,456-acre ranch, however, is currently for sale for nearly $20 million.

    Walton is one of just four women to make our list of the 50 richest people on earth — and each inherited their fortune. The next wealthiest woman is 93-year-old Liliane Bettencourt, the French heiress to the L'Oreal fortune, with a net worth of $29 billion.  

    SEE ALSO: The 50 richest people on earth

    Join the conversation about this story »

    NOW WATCH: Here’s where the 20 richest people in America live


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